Innlegg

Week 42: Hydrogen projects

Hydrogen production project

It is finally Friday and we present the highlights from the past week. The EU Horizon 2020 project Haelous will demonstrate hydrogen production in Berlevåg, Norway, while Enapter plans to build a mass-production facility for its AEMs. You can also read about a solar and hydrogen energy solution for a preschool in Sweden and a Power-to-X project in the Netherlands. 

Future plans for hydrogen production in Berlevåg

Haelous, an EU Horizon 2020 project, will demonstrate hydrogen production form windpower in Berlevåg.  The wind park at Raggovidda has a concession for 200 MW, where only 45 MW have been built because of the export limitations. 2nd October Haelous partner Varanger Kraft informed that they plan to produce one ton hydrogen/day by electrolysis in the demonstration period. The wind park’s owner, Varanger Kraft, released on Wednesday their long-term plan for the exploitation of the hydrogen that will be produced in Berlevåg.

 The ammonia production plant will have a capacity of 110 000 tons a year, and could be ready by 2025. This would imply a hydrogen production capacity of about 50 tons a day, or 50 times the Haeolus project and about 125 MW of electrolysers. The main application is to supply ammonia to Svalbard as compensation for coal power. The demand at Svalbard alone is too low for cost-efficient ammonia production. ZEEDS is looking into the possibility of using the ammonia produced at Berlevåg as green fuel for ships.  


 

Mass-production facility for AEMs in Germany

Enapter, a company that designs and manufacture highly efficient hydrogen generators, has this week revealed plans to build its first mass-production facility for AEMs (Anion exchange membrane) in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. The «Enapter Campus» will include both production centre and research and development facilities. The new production site will be capable of production of more than 100 000 AEM electrolyser modules per year.

The construction is planned to begin in early 2021, and the Campus is expected to be operational in 2022. The Enapter Campus will be using renewable energy provided by Saebeck’s solar, wind and biomass plants, and from the Campus’ own solar arrays and hydrogen storage systems.

The AEM technology is patent-protected by Enapter. The AEM electrolyser use a semipermeable membrane to allow anions to pass, in contrary to a PEM electrolyser that let protons pass the membrane. This results flexbility, fast response time high current density and high purity hydrogen. This type of electrolyser does not require expensive noble metal catalysts materials or large amount if titanium. The electrolysers has a hydrogen production rate at 1,1 kg/hour, resulting in a capacity of about 26 kg/day.

Enapter electrolyser AEM hydrogen production

Enapter’s electrolyser has a capacity of 1kg per hour. Source: Enapter


 

Preschool with a solar and hydrogen energy solution

Construction company Serneke is, in collaboration with Mariestad municipality, building a preschool with a solar and hydrogen solution. The total costs of the project is SEK 65 million, and the preschool will be the first of its kind in Sweden. Construction will start this month in Mariestad, and the preschool will be built on the same property as the old Kronoparksskolan was located. The project is expected to be completed by January 2022.

Nilsson Energy is the supplier for the energy solution where solar cells will be installed at the roof. Hydrogen will be produced by surplus electricity, and the production and storage will take place outside the school building. Hydrogen gas will be converted to electrical and thermal energy during the dark periods of the year. 

preschool hydrogen energy solution

Illustration of the preschool with a solar and hydrogen energy solution . Source: Serneke


 

Power-to-X pilot project in the Netherlands

The Dutch energy company Alliander has contracted Green Hydrogen Systems (GHS) to supply electrolysers for for their large-scale Power-to-X pilot project in the Netherlands. The pilot is under construction at the Ecomunitypark in Oosterwolde. The contract covers the supply of three alkaline electrolysers with a combined capacity of 1,4 MW.

Solar-farm developer GroenLeven is also involved in this project. The electrolysers will be used to convert excess solar or wind energy into hydrogen, and the hydrogen will be stored and sold for use in transportation, industry, heating and other areas.


 

Hydrogen podcasts

Listening to podcasts is a good way to learn something new or to get an update on something you are interested in. We want to introduce you to three podcasts that has  energy and hydrogen on the agenda:

Greenpod (Norwegian)

Greenstats’s brand new Greenpod. New episodes are just around the corner. You can find the podcast here.

AksjeSladder (Norwegian)

The episode is about hydrogen and the development of hydrogen in the maritime sector, transport sector and the industry. Listen here

H2Podcast: Everything About Hydrogen (English)

Everything About Hydrogen is a podcast that converts the technical to the relatable and explores how hydrogen and its derivative technologies may change the energy world as we know it. Listen here.


Do you want to be updated on the development in the hydrogen market? Sign up for our news letter here. Contact us for an overview of existing and planned projects in Norway and the world: greensight@greensight.no

Siemens hydrogen production Wundsiedel Energy Park

Week 40: Hydrogen production and applications

Siemens hydrogen production Wundsiedel Energy Park

In this weeks newsletter, we have bad news for the hydrogen environment in Vestland, Norway: The politicians have decided that it will be no zero-emission requirements for the high-speed passenger ferries by 2024, as previously decided. We can also read about hydrogen production plants, hydrogen-powered cabins at construction sites and hydrogen trains. Lastly, ZeroAvia has reported a world’s first flight with a hydrogen-powered commercial plane.

 

No zero-emission requirement for high-speed passenger ferries

The politicians of the County municipality of Vestland decided in December 2019 that the four high-speed passenger ferries between Bergen and Indre Sogn, and Bergen and Nordfjord should be emission-free by 2024. This week the same politicians decided not to apply a zero-emission requirement from 2024 after all, but instead the tender with the best combination between cost and emissions will win. This will most likely result in hybrid diesel/battery systems to be the winners, thus halting the developement of hydrogen systems. Ship designer LMG Marin is not happy about the announcement, and says the decision will decelerate the ongoing development on zero-emission vessels. They are part of a consortium that have been developing a zero-emission hydrogen soulution for these connections, called Zeff, and estimate that they so far have spent 21 million NOK on the consept, that now might be a waste.   

Both politicians and industry have previously thought that hydrogen was a suited solution for these routes and that this could contribute to the technology development in Norway. Instead, the politicians want to announce a pilot contract for one zero-emission vessel, that will be tested outside ordinary operation.


 

Large scale hydrogen production plant in Germany

Siemens has revealed plans to build one of the largest hydrogen production plants in Germany. The plant will be located in the Wundsiedel Energy Park in the north of Bavaria, with an initial capacity to produce more than 900 tonnes of hydrogen per year in the first phase.

Groundbreaking is scheduled for the end of 2020 and commissioning at the end of 2021. The plant will run on renewable energy and produce green hydrogen by PEM electrolysis. The hydrogen will be filled into gas cylinders for local distribution and shipped by truck to local and regional end customers. The plant will also provide flexibility for the grid. A public hydrogen filling station for trucks and buses  may be added later at the same location.

Siemens hydrogen production Wundsiedel Energy Park

Wundsiedel Energy Park. Source: Siemens


 

Green hydrogen production plant in France

Lyhfe Hydrogen has begun the construction of a renewable hydrogen production plant in Bouin, France. The production is estimated to start in May 2021, producing green hydrogen from the Bouin wind turbines by electrolysis. The investment of the project is 6 million euros,  and the plant has a production capacity of 300 kilograms per day, with plans to double and triple the capacity in the nearest future. This gives a yearly capacity of 110 tonnes, and the production plant will be a small plant compared to the 900 tonnes a day plant in Germany.


 

Hydrogen-powered cabins to cut emissions at construction sites

UK-based HS2 has trialled solar and hydrogen-powered welfare cabins at some of their construction sites to cut carbon emissions. The EasyCabin EcoSmart ZERO product may be the first solar and hydrogen-powered welfare unit of its kind.

Solar energy and hydrogen is combined to reduce emissions. Data were gathered from 16 deployed cabins over a 21-week period. The hydrogen technology replaces traditional diesel power systems, resulting in savings of 112 tonnes of carbon during the period.


 

Hydrogen trains in Britain and the Netherlands

A hydrogen-powered train has travelled on Britain’s rail network for the first time. The prototype Hydroflex travelled a 25-mile round trip, reaching speeds up to 50 mph. The aim is to carry paying passengers by end of 2021.

In March, Alstom completed tests for their Corodia iLint hydrogen train in the Netherlands. The report was released this week, and states that Alstom’s train has met the four objectives of the test frame: authorisation to run on the Dutch railway network, fully zero emission,  perfectly fitting the commercial service, and quick and easy refuelling.


 

World’s first hydrogen-powered commercial aircraft takes to skies

Hydrogen-powered aircrafts were on the agenda last week. Just hours after we published our news update, ZeroAvia could report that their hydrogen-powered six-seater Piper M-class plane had completed a successful 20 minutes flight above Bedfordshire. ZeroAvia aims to make hydrogen planes available commercially in three years.


Do you want to be updated on the development in the hydrogen market? Sign up for our news letter here. Contact us for an overview of existing and planned projects in Norway and the world: greensight@greensight.no

Week 37: Hydrogen and maritime sector

hydrogen maritime sector transport

Hydrogen in the maritime sector is on the agenda this week. The Norwegian Public Roads Administration recommends hydrogen for the ferries on the Vestfjorden-connection, but the Government has not made a decision yet. We can also read about overwhelming interest by shipping companies for a hydrogen bulkcarrier for Norwegian companies, while Ballard introduces a maritime FC-module to power ships. Lastly we’ll have a look at million dollars funding in California and a wind project in Denmark. 

 

Hydrogen or biogas in Vestfjorden?

Statens Vegvesen (The Norwegian Public Roads Administration) is ready to present a tender on four new hydrogen ferries on the Vestfjorden-connection (connecting the city of Bodø with the famous Lofoten Islands) from 2023. However, the Norwegian Government wants to examine the use of biogas as well before they make any decisions. The Ministry of Transport has not concluded yet, but a conclusion is expected during September. The importance of hydrogen is emphasised in the newly presented Norwegian Hydrogen Strategy, and it has been questioned that the Government does not follow their own strategy and goes all in on biogas on the connection.

This is an important decission for the hydrogen future in Norway. Use of hydrogen can give advantages in the hydrogen market, especially in the maritime sector, and the Vestfjorden-connection can be the second connection with hydrogen ferries in Norway. Todays’ contract on the connection expires in the end of 2022.

ferge hydrogen vestfjorden

MF Landegode, one of the four LNG-ferries operating the rough Vestfjorden-connection today. Source: Torghatten Nord


Hydrogen ferries in Vestfjorden – comments by Zero

Hydrogen ferries in Vestfjorden should be the start of the Norwegian hydrogen investment, and it will be an important step to ensure a hydrogen value chain in Norway. The organisation Zero says that a hydrogen powered connection over Vestfjorden will ensure a large enough volume of hydrogen to get the first large-scale hydrogen production in operation.

The hydrogen ferries will be the first of many projects within hydrogen in maritime and transport sector. The demand on zero-emission in the ferry tenders has put the Norwegian maritime cluster in a world leading position within green technology. Zero supports The Norwegian Public Roads Administration’s recommendation with hydrogen in Vestfjorden, and the Government should do the same. 


 

Overwhelming interest for hydrogen bulkcarrier

Felleskjøpet Agri and Heidelberg Cement challenges shipping companies to new thinking  and  zero-emission bulkcarriersIn practice, shipowners have to go for liquid hydrogen or ammonia produced with zero emissions, and the response has been overwhelming, according to the companies. 

The use of  biofuel in 50 years old diesel engine technologies is not innovative enough for the companies, according to the Chartering Manager of Heidelberg Cement North Europe. Felleskjøpet Agri and Heidelberg Cement announced in July that they will offer a 20 years contract to the shipping company that can offer them a zero emission bulkcarrier by 2023. They will choose the best suited shipping company by December, for further development of detailed solutions in spring 2021.

Heidelberg Cement is transporting 500 000 tons of stones and gravels from Western to Eastern Norway, while Felleskjøpet Agri transports grains the opposite direction. The ship is calculated to use one ton of hydrogen each day, with possible bunkering opportunities in Rogaland County or in the Oslo Fjord.


 

Ballard introduces zero-emission FC-module to power ships

This week Ballard Power Systems announced the launch of the fuel cell industry´s first module designed for primary propulsion power in marine vessels. The fuell cell product FCwave is a 200 kW module unit that can be scaled up to muli-megawatt power level.

The FCwave can be used to power marine vessels such as passenger and car ferries, river push boats and fishing boats. It can also be used as stationary electrical power to support hotel and auxiliary load on cruise ships and other vessels while docked at port. The International Maritime Organization has set  targets to lower emissions by 50 percent by 2050 in the marine sector. This product could be a game changer for the introduction of hydrogen to the maritime area.

Hydrogen maritime sector fuelcell

Source: Ballard


 

California approves 39,1 million dollars for hydrogen stations

California Energy Commission regulators have approved 39,1 million dollars of funding for a total of 36 hydrogen stations to service passenger vehicles. The funds were awarded to FirstElement, Iwanti and Shell. Another 87 stations were also recommended for funding, meaning California could have 123 new hydrogen stations. The state has currently 42 hydrogen stations opened. 


 

Wind-to-Hydrogen project  one step closer to production

Siemens Gamesa is partnering up with Green Hydrogen Systems (GHS) for a wind-to-hydrogen project in Denmark. The production of hydrogen is scheduled to start in January 2021 and the project involves a three megawatt Siemens wind turbine that will power a GHS elecrolyser.

The green hydrogen will be stored and used for subsequent distribution and used as fuel for hydrogen-powered buses, taxis and cars, while the oxygen will be released into the atmosphere.


Do you want to be updated on the development in the hydrogen market? Sign up for our news letter here. Contact us for an overview of existing and planned projects in Norway and the world: greensight@greensight.no